Alternating series #1 | Visual solution |

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From: Think Twice
Duration: 01:37

A short animation about a visual solution to an alternating series:)

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Support my animations on:

https://www.patreon.com/Think_twice

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Any further questions or ideas:

Email - thinktwiceask@gmail.com

Twitter - https://twitter.com/thinktwice2580

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Programs used:

- Cinema 4D

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Music:

" Gone For Now "- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkJ-5Pb-514

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jlvanderzwan
1 day ago
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Grocery store strangeness

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I can never get over the fact that grocery stores have ‘natural’ and ‘healthy’ food sections — as if natural and healthy food is a specialized, niche product in the overall groceries market.

We have invented a strange world, people.

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jhamill
8 days ago
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Marketing!
California
jlvanderzwan
1 day ago
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Logos for Trump’s Space Force from eight leading designers

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Bloomberg Businessweek asked eight designers to design a logo for Trump’s proposed new branch of the military, Space Force. 89-year-old Milton Glaser, designer of the iconic I ❤ NY logo, can still bring the heat:

Space Force Logo

I really really *really* want this on a hat. (via df)

Tags: design   Donald Trump   logos   Milton Glaser
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jlvanderzwan
1 day ago
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Brutal
bjtitus
16 days ago
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Denver, CO
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2 public comments
istoner
9 days ago
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Relevant to the launch of Team Trump's new Space Force product line...
cinebot
11 days ago
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A+++++
toronto.

Distill Update 2018

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An Update from the Editorial Team
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jlvanderzwan
3 days ago
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Intelligence

2 Comments and 6 Shares


Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
Call me, movie studios. I could write this script in 3 hours.


Today's News:
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jlvanderzwan
4 days ago
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The real joke is of course that everyone goes for Einstein in a world where John von Neumann[0], Srinivasa Ramanujan[1] and Bertrand Russel[2] also exist (well, used to exist)

=====

EDIT: I'm more than slightly annoyed by my male-centric top three here, so I tried to think of extremely prolific female geniuses. So my mind went to Marie Curie[3], Margaret Hamilton[4], Grace Hopper[5], Marilyn vos Savant[6], and Lynn Margulis[7] (my favourite - crazy contrarian conspiracy theorist near the end of her life, but punk AF).

They are all awesome of course, but more as "famous successful and important scientists" (except for vos Savant). None are quite so "polymathy" or extremely prolific.

I can explain that within the historical context of sexism and traditional gender roles but goddamn is it frustrating.


So I check Wikipedia. First the list of women in science. Full of amazing scientists, but nothing that helps me figure out who is *exceptional* among them. So onto the list of child prodigies we go[9]. Well.. ehm... again nobody quite as prolific... Anne-Marie Imafidon[10] is cool but it's too young to tell.

And then there is Hildegart Rodríguez Carballeira, whose tragic story is a stark reminder of what we're actually joking about here

> Hildegart Rodríguez Carballeira (December 9, 1914 in Madrid – June 9, 1933 in Madrid) was an activist for socialism and sexual revolution, born and raised by her mother as a model for the woman of the future. She spoke 6 languages when eight years old, finished law school as a teenager, and was a leader of the Spanish Socialist Workers' Party and afterward of the Federal Party.

> Hildegart was conceived in Ferrol by Aurora Rodríguez Carballeira and an undisclosed biological father chosen by her mother with eugenic intentions. When she was sure she was pregnant, she moved to Madrid, where Hildegart was born. Aurora set a clock to wake herself up every hour, allowing her to change her sleep position so blood could irrigate the fetus uniformly.

> Hildegart spoke 6 languages when eight years old

> In June 1928, at age 13½, she enrolled in the School of Law of the Complutense University of Madrid. She later gave lessons at its School of Philosophy during the Second Spanish Republic.

> She was a leader of the Spanish Socialist Workers' Party and afterward of the Federal Party.

> Hildegart was one of the most active people in the Spanish movement for sex reformation. She was connected to the European vanguard, corresponding with Havelock Ellis, whom she translated, and Margaret Sanger.

> By the time she was 17 years old and had become internationally known, her mother shot her to death.

> There were several hypotheses about the cause of the murder. Hildegart may have fallen in love. She intended to separate from her mother who, out of paranoia, threatened suicide. Aurora's explanation was that "the sculptor, after discovering a minimal imperfection in his work, destroys it." She shot her daughter twice in the head and twice in the heart

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[0] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_von_Neumann

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Srinivasa_Ramanujan

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertrand_Russell



[3] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Curie

[4] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Hamilton_%28scientist%29

[5] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grace_Hopper

[6] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marilyn_vos_Savant.

[7] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynn_Margulis


[8] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_female_scientists_in_the_20th_century

[9] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_child_prodigies

[10] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne-Marie_Imafidon

[11] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hildegart_Rodr%C3%ADguez_Carballeira
jlvanderzwan
3 days ago
Oh and btw, why is it always the genes they focus on? The prenatal environment is also a huge factor, but you never hear anyone about creating a cloning vat copying the womb of mothers of geniuses https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heritability_of_IQ#Maternal_(fetal)_environment
toddgrotenhuis
2 days ago
Also, Amish and Hutterites have their own genetic problems due to inbreeding. (Full disclosure: I'm a Anabaptist/Mennonite (but not a hereditary one).)
jlvanderzwan
21 hours ago
(Eh, my family name is Van der Zwan. Until three generations ago, they all lived in one single village in the west of the Netherlands so I can probably safely bet that half of my genes are the product of inbreeding: http://www.cbgfamilienamen.nl/nfb/detail_naam.php?gba_lcnaam=van%20der%20zwan&gba_naam=van%20der%20Zwan&nfd_naam=Zwan,%20van%20der&operator=eq&taal= )
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rocketo
16 hours ago
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shared for the comments
seattle, wa

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - The Event

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
Why are you so favored as to get a comic drawn by Abby Howard? She has a new book out! See the blog below the comic.


Today's News:
Dinosaur Empire 2 is out!
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jlvanderzwan
5 days ago
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Note how the main character looks like David Graeber
duerig
4 days ago
It is interesting that Graeber seems to have tapped into two completely different segments of the population. One segment is disatisfied with their job because it isn't fulfilling. The other likes to believe that they are the doing the actual important work, the truly indispensable people who ware supporting the riffraff on their generosity. By combining these two classes of people, he has managed to transmute the unpleasant or monotonous into the unnecessary.
jlvanderzwan
4 days ago
RE: second type, do you mean "underpaid but fulfilling work"? Because your wording is more than a little vague
duerig
3 days ago
I'm still thinking through my skepticism of Graeber's article and now book. Overall, I think there are three basic ways we can relate to our jobs. One way is to see our job as a small part of an important endeavor. We recognize that our job has value, but there are billions of people out there and so the overall impact of any one job is going to be small. A second way to see our job is as completely unimportant while our 'real life' happens outside. This could result from a dislike of the job or a focus on family or some other all-consuming hobby or ambition. In this way of thinking, I might emphasize the fact that if I or even my job position disappeared tomorrow, the world would go on pretty much as before. And in a world of billions this is a true statement. The third way of seeing your job is as a mission or calling. Your job is absolutely vital and you can't walk away from it because you are indispensable. This way of thinking emphasizes the importance of a job and de-emphasizes that it is ultimately a small role. One way of emphasizing your own importance is to diminish that of others. If I am a professor who thinks that my teaching and research are the vital components of my life, I might dismiss the person who works in HR as being part of the organizational overhead. That would make me feel better, like I was the true spirit of the large organization I was part of. So I think of the three categories, people who feel better about dismissing their own jobs will be attracted to Graeber's message. And people who feel better by emphasizing the importance of their own jobs by dismissing the jobs of others will be attracted to Graeber's message. But that it would be more accurate to say it is unlikely that a large proportion of jobs are mere sinecures. And that most explanations of why a certain class of job is really 'bullshit' tend to come down to 'if things were different, things would be different'. If we had a single-payer health care system, a lot of jobs in the insurance industry would no longer be necessary. If people didn't need to be hired and fired, we wouldn't need HR departments. Etc. And when any large group of people has gone out on strike it has turned out both that they were necessary (mines or transit or whatever closed down for a while) but also that they could be replaced (scabs and firings and alternatives). So I'm skeptical of Graeber's claims. And I think that both kinds of people who are attracted to these claims find them comfortable and this can lead to them sounding more convincing.
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